Welcome To Octavia's blog

sesamestreet:

A few hours ago, we shared Elmo’s picture outside NASA’s Vehicle Assembly Building.  But guess what?  They let him go inside!  Here’s a quick video from his tour!

staff:

Introducing your new Activity page (and “Tumblarity”)
Two big things:
We’ve added a new link on your Dashboard labeled Tumblarity.  This will take you to your new Activity page where you can see cumulative and trending stats about your activity on Tumblr.

For the past few months we’ve been using an internal metric called “Tumblarity” to sort and filter content on the Search and Popular Content pages.  Tumblarity is derived from every blog’s activity and popularity across our network.  We’re getting ready to start using it to organize the boss new Tumblr directory (which should be done next week!).
For the first time, you can view your Tumblarity on the Dashboard and Activity page.

Please ignore the fact that I’m less popular than fuckyeahparamore.

staff:

Introducing your new Activity page (and “Tumblarity”)

Two big things:

  • We’ve added a new link on your Dashboard labeled Tumblarity.  This will take you to your new Activity page where you can see cumulative and trending stats about your activity on Tumblr.
  • For the past few months we’ve been using an internal metric called “Tumblarity” to sort and filter content on the Search and Popular Content pages.  Tumblarity is derived from every blog’s activity and popularity across our network.  We’re getting ready to start using it to organize the boss new Tumblr directory (which should be done next week!).

    For the first time, you can view your Tumblarity on the Dashboard and Activity page.

Please ignore the fact that I’m less popular than fuckyeahparamore.

npr:

The FIRST ever YouTube video.

newyorker:

Will Robert Kyncl and YouTube Revolutionize Television?

On the evening of April 23, 2005, Karim uploaded the first video [above] to YouTube—an eighteen-second clip of him, standing in front of the elephant enclosure at the San Diego Zoo, wearing an ill-fitting hiking jacket. He says, “The cool thing about these guys is that they have really, really, really long trunks, and that’s cool,” smirks a little, and ends with “And that’s pretty much all there is to say.” Civilization would never be the same.

- In this week’s issue: YouTube wants to change the face of television. John Seabrook talks to the two men mapping out the future of TV: http://nyr.kr/yDrODs

nationalpost:

Mystery of oldest recorded supernova solved. In 185 A.D., Chinese astronomers noted a “guest star” that mysteriously appeared in the sky and stayed for about eight months. By the 1960s, scientists had determined that the mysterious object was the first documented supernova. Later, they pinpointed the object, known as RCW 86, as a supernova remnant located about 8,000 light-years away but remained puzzled at how the star’s spherical remains were larger than expected.

nationalpost:

Mystery of oldest recorded supernova solved. In 185 A.D., Chinese astronomers noted a “guest star” that mysteriously appeared in the sky and stayed for about eight months. By the 1960s, scientists had determined that the mysterious object was the first documented supernova. Later, they pinpointed the object, known as RCW 86, as a supernova remnant located about 8,000 light-years away but remained puzzled at how the star’s spherical remains were larger than expected.

theatlantic:

Winners of the National Geographic Photo Contest 2011

“Splashing”, Grand Prize Winner and winner of the Nature category. This photo was taken when I was taking photos of other insects, as I normally did during macro photo hunting. I wasn’t actually aware of this dragonfly since I was occupied with other objects. When I was about to take a picture of it, it suddenly rained, but the lighting was just superb. I decided to take the shot regardless of the rain. The result caused me to be overjoyed, and I hope it pleases viewers. Location: Batam, Riau Islands, Indonesia. (© Shikhei Goh)

See more fantastic photos at The Atlantic

theatlantic:

Winners of the National Geographic Photo Contest 2011

“Splashing”, Grand Prize Winner and winner of the Nature category. This photo was taken when I was taking photos of other insects, as I normally did during macro photo hunting. I wasn’t actually aware of this dragonfly since I was occupied with other objects. When I was about to take a picture of it, it suddenly rained, but the lighting was just superb. I decided to take the shot regardless of the rain. The result caused me to be overjoyed, and I hope it pleases viewers. Location: Batam, Riau Islands, Indonesia. (© Shikhei Goh)

See more fantastic photos at The Atlantic

iheartbees:

URBAN BEEKEEPING -
“Urban beekeeping has been all the buzz, lately.  And for as many people that keep bees, there are that many reasons WHY people keep bees.
One of the most important reasons to keep bees is for pollination.  Bee pollination is needed for the production of an estimated one-third of the food crops grown in developed countries. When it comes to fruit, the number of bees visiting a plant affects the size, uniformity and amount of fruit it produces. Bee pollination also has an impact on other foods we eat, such as meat, since the animals we consume often eat plants pollinated by bees.
It’s common knowledge that the honey bee produces honey, but did you know that they also provide us with wax, pollen, royal jelly, propolis and venom? These by-products have different uses but are all considered beneficial to our health. “Apitherapy” means the use of honeybee products for medicinal purposes.
Urban beekeeping is essential as the commercial beekeepers have sustained huge losses all over the country year after year. As urban beekeepers we can practices sans medications and chemicals. We can provide diversity-rich habits as well as encourage those around us to reduce and or eliminate the use of pesticides. Beekeeping is a very civic hobby!  But beyond that, it’s a lot of fun, challenging and rewarding.”
[click here to view the original post on botanicgardensblog.com]

iheartbees:

URBAN BEEKEEPING -

“Urban beekeeping has been all the buzz, lately.  And for as many people that keep bees, there are that many reasons WHY people keep bees.

One of the most important reasons to keep bees is for pollination.  Bee pollination is needed for the production of an estimated one-third of the food crops grown in developed countries. When it comes to fruit, the number of bees visiting a plant affects the size, uniformity and amount of fruit it produces. Bee pollination also has an impact on other foods we eat, such as meat, since the animals we consume often eat plants pollinated by bees.

It’s common knowledge that the honey bee produces honey, but did you know that they also provide us with wax, pollen, royal jelly, propolis and venom? These by-products have different uses but are all considered beneficial to our health. “Apitherapy” means the use of honeybee products for medicinal purposes.

Urban beekeeping is essential as the commercial beekeepers have sustained huge losses all over the country year after year. As urban beekeepers we can practices sans medications and chemicals. We can provide diversity-rich habits as well as encourage those around us to reduce and or eliminate the use of pesticides. Beekeeping is a very civic hobby!  But beyond that, it’s a lot of fun, challenging and rewarding.”

[click here to view the original post on botanicgardensblog.com]

carlzimmer:

Kepler-22b: A planet with the right stuff for Earth-like life? Bad Astronomy has the details 

carlzimmer:

Kepler-22b: A planet with the right stuff for Earth-like life? Bad Astronomy has the details 

thealcalde:

An undated Texas Basketball photo.

thealcalde:

An undated Texas Basketball photo.

Twice as bad

shitmystudentswrite:

One of the worst leaders in history is Joseph Stalin, who later was known as Adolf Hitler.